The beginnings of Mail Rail

By the turn of the 20th century, congested streets and fog meant that mail transported between the main Post Offices and railway stations in London was severely delayed. A Departmental Committee was set up in 1909 to study the use of underground pneumatic and electric railways. In February 1911, it recommended construction of an electric railway with driverless trains. Their recommendations were accepted and in 1913 the Post Office (London) Railway Bill was passed as an Act.

The rail connected the West and East ends of London, with eight stations along the way.

The tunnelling work was completed in 1917 but due to the focus on the First World War work on the railway was not put to use until 1923. The railway was finally opened in late 1927 using electrically powered driverless trains.

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